Great Stuff: Dawn McGuire & Paul Watsky

When:
October 18, 2012 @ 7:00 pm – 10:00 pm
2012-10-18T19:00:00-07:00
2012-10-18T22:00:00-07:00
Where:
Uptown Body Shop
401 26th St
Oakland, CA 94612
USA

POETRY AT THE UPTOWN AUTOBODY SHOP AND ART GALLERY
401 26TH ST (AT WEBSTER) THURSDAY, OCTOBER 18, 7 PM

Join Dawn McGuire and Paul Watsky in this awesome Oakland venue. McGuire will read from her new collection, The Aphasia Café. McGuire, a neurologist and Professor at the Neuroscience Institute of Morehouse School of Medicine, has published three collections. Her work has appeared in numerous journals and anthologies. She most recently won the Sarah Lawrence/ Campbell Corner Language Exchange Prize for “poems that treat larger themes with lyric intensity.” In her best-selling third book, The Aphasia Café, McGuire enters into the world of her aphasic patients to explore the way we use language to construct our identity and world. These accessible, powerful poems invite listeners to enter into a conversation about language, identity, silence, and human resilience

Paul Watsky is the author of Telling The Difference (Fisher King Press, 2010) and co-translator with Emiko Miyashita of Santoka (PIE Books, 2006). His work has appeared or is forthcoming are Interim, Smartish Pace, The Carolina Quarterly, Many Mountains Moving, Alabama Literary Review, The Pinch, and Natural Bridge. “To quote Norman O. Brown quoting Euripides, ‘God made an opening for the unexpected,’ and at long last we have what many of us have greatly desired: a collection of poems by Paul Watsky. His is a singular voice in contemporary poetry, with a range that encompasses the wry, the mordant, the laugh-out-loud funny and the deeply moving, often within the same poem. One of Ovid’s earliest critics complained that he did not know when to leave well enough alone. In this he resembles the eponymous hero of Watsky’s ‘The Magnificent Goldstein,’ and, come to think of it, Watsky himself, for which we have cause to rejoice.” -Charles Martin

About The Aphasia Cafe
Aphasia is a communication disorder that impairs a person’s ability to use words. One out of every 250 Americans suffers from aphasia. In what she calls “experiments in lyric,” she dwells for a time in the Aphasia Cafe, the place of broken language. These poems depict the profound frustrations and the extraordinary resilience of many afflicted individuals as they fight to maintain a sense of self and world after catastrophes such as stroke and brain injury.
Praised by the California Poet Laureate, McGuire’s poems explore language as the way we construct our sense of self and the world. “Our brains are hard wired to create meaning,” McGuire says. “We make meaning with language; in language, we tell the story of our lives. After stroke or head injury, the breakdown in the ability to use and understand words can mean unbearable confusion and social exclusion. “McGuire’s poems also explore the common, funny, sometimes haunting moments when language fails each of us, the “continuum of aphasia”. “These poems stitch the pieces of a broken world together word by word, with the intelligence of a surgeon put on earth to heal and the heart of a
Poet showing a lover how to love”. Thomas Fuller, author of Ambivalence.

Paul Watsky is the author of Telling The Difference (Fisher King Press, 2010) and co-translator with Emiko Miyashita of Santoka (PIE Books, 2006). Among the journals where his work recently has appeared or will be forthcoming are Interim, Smartish Pace, The Carolina Quarterly, Many Mountains Moving, Alabama Literary Review, The Pinch, and Natural Bridge.
“To quote Norman O. Brown quoting Euripides, ‘God made an opening for the unexpected,’ and at long last we have what many of us have greatly desired: a collection of poems by Paul Watsky. His is a singular voice in contemporary poetry, with a range that encompasses the wry, the mordant, the laugh-out-loud funny and the deeply moving, often within the same poem. One of Ovid’s earliest critics complained that he did not know when to leave well enough alone. In this he resembles the eponymous hero of Watsky’s ‘The Magnificent Goldstein,’ and, come to think of it, Watsky himself, for which we have cause to rejoice.” -Charles Martin, author of Where the River Ends.

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